Calder Foundation

Archive

Life period
1937–1945

Type
All

See highlights from 1937–1945 on the timeline Public Commissions and the War


Works
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Exhibitions 77

Historical Photos 184
Calder with Dolores (1937)
Calder with Dolores, Pilar, and Joan Miró, Varengeville, summer 1937Photograph by Hans Hartung © Hans Hartung / ADAGP, Paris
Calder with Dolores, Pilar, and Joan Miró, Varengeville, summer 1937
Photograph by Hans Hartung
Installation photograph showing Hi! (c. 1928), Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Devil Fish, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Starfish (1934), Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Untitled (1936), Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Tightrope (1936), White Panel (1936), and Untitled, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Untitled, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Snake and the Cross (1936), Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Mercury Fountain in the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World’s Fair, July 1937
Photograph by Hugo P. Herdeg
Untitled (1938) in Calder’s “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
Untitled, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Apple Monster (1938)
Apple Monster, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Apple Monster, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Blue Panel (1938)
Blue Panel (1936), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Blue Panel (1936), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder and Louisa Calder (1938)
Calder and Louisa Calder, Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder and Louisa Calder, Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1938)
Calder with the base of Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with the base of Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1938)
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder and daughter Sandra (1938)
Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Louisa Calder playing accordion (1938)
Louisa Calder playing accordion, Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Louisa Calder playing accordion, Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Sandra Calder (1938)
Sandra Calder, Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Sandra Calder, Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Well Sweep (1936) at James Thrall Soby’s home in Farmington, Connecticut, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder and Louisa Calder having lunch with Stamo Papadaki (1938)
Calder and Louisa Calder having lunch with Stamo Papadaki, Roxbury, c. 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder and Louisa Calder having lunch with Stamo Papadaki, Roxbury, c. 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1938)
Calder assembling Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, summer 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder assembling Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, summer 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder’s “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
"Small shop" New York City storefront studio, winter 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
“Small shop” New York City storefront studio, winter 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder assembling Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, summer 1938. Steel Fish (1934) is pictured in the distance.
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with goats (1938)
Calder with goats, Roxbury, c. 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with goats, Roxbury, c. 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Maquette for Object on Davit and two maquettes for Spherical Triangle, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
Untitled, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
Untitled, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Louisa Calder playing accordion for Calder and daughter Sandra (1938)
Louisa Calder playing accordion for Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Louisa Calder playing accordion for Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Steel Fish (1938)
Steel Fish (1934), Roxbury, c. 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Steel Fish (1934), Roxbury, c. 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1938)
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, summer 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Five Rods and Nine Discs (1936), Roxbury, summer 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Black Areas (1938)
Calder with Black Areas, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with Black Areas, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Spherical Triangle (1938)
Spherical Triangle, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Spherical Triangle, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Dancers and Sphere (maquette for 1939 New York World’s Fair), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Dancers and Sphere (maquette for 1939 New York World’s Fair) set in motion, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
Untitled, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1937), “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1938)
Untitled (1937), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1937), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
The Orange Panel (1938)
The Orange Panel (1936), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Orange Panel (1936), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Ritou (1938)
Ritou (1936), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Ritou (1936), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1938)
Untitled, 1938Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, 1938
Photograph by Herbert Matter
The Calder Family (1939)
The Calder Family, New York, 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Calder Family, New York, 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) set in motion (1939)
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) set in motion (1939)
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) set in motion (1939)
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) set in motion (1939)
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) frozen (1939)
Untitled (1936) frozen, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) frozen, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1936) set in motion (1939)
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1936) set in motion, c. 1939
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1949)
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1939), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1949Photograph by Soichi Sunami © Museum of Modern Art, Soichi Sunami
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1939), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1949
Photograph by Soichi Sunami
Untitled (maquette, 1939) and Spiny (maquette, 1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
The Spider (1940)
The Spider, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Spider, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Sphere Pierced by Cylinders (1940)
Sphere Pierced by Cylinders (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Sphere Pierced by Cylinders (1939), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Spider (1940)
Spider (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Spider (1939), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Eucalyptus, “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1940)
Eucalyptus, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Eucalyptus, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Leaves and Tripod (1940)
Leaves and Tripod (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Leaves and Tripod (1939), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Red “B” (1940)
Red "B", "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Red “B”, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1939) in Calder’s “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1940)
Untitled, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
The Hairpins (1940)
The Hairpins (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Hairpins (1939), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
13 Spines (1940)
13 Spines, "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
13 Spines, “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Hollow Egg (1940)
Hollow Egg (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Hollow Egg (1939), “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Cage within a Cage (c. 1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Four Leaves and Three Petals (1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1940)
Untitled (1939) outside the "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Cockatoo (1940)
Cockatoo outside the "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Cockatoo outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Untitled (maquette) (1940)
Untitled (maquette, 1939) outside the "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Untitled (maquette, 1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Spiny (1940)
Spiny (maquette, 1939) outside the "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Spiny (maquette, 1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Baby Spider (1940)
Baby Spider (1939) outside the "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Baby Spider (1939) outside the “small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Louisa Calder (1940)
Calder with Louisa Calder, Roxbury, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with Louisa Calder, Roxbury, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Louisa Calder and daughter Sandra (1940)
Calder with Louisa Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with Louisa Calder and daughter Sandra, Roxbury, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with his dog Feathers (1940)
Calder with his dog Feathers, Roxbury, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with his dog Feathers, Roxbury, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Lee Krasner wearing a Calder bracelet (1940)
Lee Krasner wearing a Calder bracelet, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Lee Krasner wearing a Calder bracelet, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder’s “small shop” New York City storefront studio (1940)
"Small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
“Small shop” New York City storefront studio, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Eucalyptus (1940)
Calder with Eucalyptus, 1940Photograph by André Kertész © Ministère de la Culture / Médiathèque de Patrimoine, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / André Kertész
Calder with Eucalyptus, 1940
Photograph by André Kertész
Installation photograph showing Black Beast, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
13 Spines (1940)
Installation photograph showing 13 Spines, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder (1940)
Installation photograph, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Installation photograph, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing Eucalyptus, Cockatoo, The Spider, and Spider (1939), Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Installation photograph showing The Spider, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Lee Krasner and Mercedes Matter modeling Calder jewelry (1940)
Contact sheet showing Lee Krasner and Mercedes Matter modeling Calder jewelry, 1940.Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Contact sheet showing Lee Krasner and Mercedes Matter modeling Calder jewelry, 1940.
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Calder with Giraffe (1941)
Calder with Giraffe, Roxbury, 1941Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Calder with Giraffe, Roxbury, 1941
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Roxbury grounds and studio (1941)
Roxbury grounds and studio, 1941Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Roxbury grounds and studio, 1941
Photograph by Herbert Matter
Aluminum Leaves, Red Post (1941)
Aluminum Leaves, Red Post, Roxbury, 1941Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Aluminum Leaves, Red Post, Roxbury, 1941
Photograph by Herbert Matter
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Chronology 103
1937

Calder designs scenery and costumes for OO to AH, a playlet in two scenes written by Charles Tracy but never performed.

CF, project file; Tracy 1937
23 February–13 March 1937

Calder’s first large-scale bolted stabiles, Devil Fish and Big Bird, are on view in “Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles” at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York.

CF, exhibition file
Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles (1937)
Installation photograph, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Installation photograph, Calder: Stabiles & Mobiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1937Photograph by Herbert Matter
5 April 1937

The Calders obtain visas in New York in preparation for their voyage to Europe.

CF, passport
7 April 1937

The Calders depart on the SS Lafayette for Le Havre, France. Their daughter Sandra, aged two, and her caretaker Dorothy Sibley join them.

Calder 1966, 156; CF, travel file
15 April 1937

The Calders arrive in Le Havre, France.

CF, passport; Calder 1966, 156
Late April 1937

Nelson and his wife, Francine, invite the Calders to stay with them in Varengeville, on the Normandy coast. Léger, Pierre Matisse, and Matisse’s wife, Teeny, also visit.

Calder 1966, 156–57
Late April or early May 1937

The Calders return to Paris, where they move to 80 boulevard Arago, a house designed by Nelson and owned by Calder’s friend Alden Brooks. Visitors include Finnish architect Alvar Aalto and his wife, Aino. Calder uses the garage, outfitted with an automotive turntable, as a studio.

Calder 1966, 157–58
May 1937

Calder and Miró visit the Spanish pavilion under construction at the 1937 World’s Fair site in Paris. Calder meets the pavilion’s architects, Josép Lluís Sert and Luis Lacasa. Sert eventually commissions Calder to make Mercury Fountain for the Spanish pavilion. Mined in Almadén in

Spain, the mercury symbolizes Republican resistance to fascism.

Calder 1966, 158; Freedberg 1986, 504–505
1–15 June 1937

Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, presents “Fantastic Art: Miró and Calder.”

CF, exhibition file
3 June 1937

Calder performs Cirque Calder at 80 boulevard Arago, Paris.

Bruguière Collection, Paris, circus invitation
July 1937

The Calders rent a house in Varengeville at 50 le Clos du Timbre, where Calder uses the garage as his studio. Jean Hélion, who had been to London a few years before, had put me in contact with John and Myfanwy Piper and Ben Nicholson and Barbara Hepworth, and we lost no

time in inviting the Pipers and the Nicholsons, separately, of course. Other visitors to the house include Georges Braque, Pierre Loeb, Miró, the Nelsons, and cultural theorist Herbert Read.

Calder 1966, 162–63
Calder with Dolores (1937)
Calder with Dolores, Pilar, and Joan Miró, Varengeville, summer 1937Photograph by Hans Hartung © Hans Hartung / ADAGP, Paris
Calder with Dolores, Pilar, and Joan Miró, Varengeville, summer 1937Photograph by Hans Hartung
12 July 1937

The Spanish pavilion, featuring Picasso’s Guernica, Miró’s Le Faucheur, and Calder’s Mercury Fountain, opens at the Paris World’s Fair.

CF, exhibition file
Mercury Fountain (1937)
Calder with Mercury Fountain in the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World's Fair, July 1937Photograph by Hugo P. Herdeg © Christian Herdeg
Calder with Mercury Fountain in the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World's Fair, July 1937Photograph by Hugo P. Herdeg
21 October 1937

The Calders arrive in Folkstone, England, later renting an apartment at Belsize Park, London. Calder establishes a studio in Camden Town and gives Cirque Calder performances.

CF, passport; Calder 1966, 164–65
After 21 October 1937

While in London, Calder makes his first gold necklace for Louisa.

CF, Calder to Warner, 16 December 1946
1–24 December 1937

The Mayor Gallery, London, exhibits “Calder: Mobiles and Stabiles.”

CF, exhibition file
Calder: Mobiles and Stabiles (1937)
Calder with Untitled (c. 1936), Calder: Mobiles and Stabiles, Mayor Gallery, London, 1937
Calder with Untitled (c. 1936), Calder: Mobiles and Stabiles, Mayor Gallery, London, 1937
11 December 1937

A review of the exhibition at the Mayor Gallery notes, Calder’s jewelry is as pretty as his mobiles—some of it too is “mobile”—and often more seriously lovely. If the lady of fashion has the wit to see it, she may find that pieces of human ingenuity make rather more distinguished ornaments

than Cartier’s portable currency.

CF, exhibition file; New Statesman and Nation, 11 December
14 December 1937

In reference to the Mayor Gallery exhibition, Calder writes, The show is going quite well . . . Sold 3 objects so far, + a lot of jewelry. Buyers of his jewelry include prominent characters of London society, including Lady Clark, wife of London’s National Gallery director, Kenneth Clark.

CF, Calder to Sweeney, 14 December; CF, exhibition file, unsigned newspaper clipping from Sketch, 8 December
22 December 1937

An unsigned review of the Mayor Gallery in Vogue declares, Calder . . . occasionally makes jewellery of great charm and originality. He bends and twists gold and silver metal into fantastic and gorgeous patterns, very much in the modern manner. Women of taste should ask to see some at the

Gallery.

CF, exhibition file; "Shop-Hound Goes to a Party," 1937

1938

1 March 1938

The Calders return to New York. They rent a different apartment in the building at 244 East Eighty-sixth Street and Second Avenue where they had previously lived.

Calder 1966, 167
October 1938

Calder begins construction of a large studio on the old dairy barn foundations in Roxbury. Soon after, he converts his icehouse studio into a living space that comes to be known as the “Big Room.”

Calder 1966, 169–70
Calder during the construction of his Roxbury studio (1938)
Calder during the construction of his Roxbury studio, 1938
Calder during the construction of his Roxbury studio, 1938
8–27 November 1938

Calder’s first retrospective, “Calder Mobiles,” is presented by the George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery, Springfield, Massachusetts. Sweeney writes a foreword to the catalogue. Aalto, Léger, architectural historian Siegfried Giedion, and art patron Katherine S. Dreier attend the

opening. Sixty-one pieces of jewelry are included in the exhibition.

CF, exhibition file
Calder Mobiles (1938)
The opening of Calder Mobiles, George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery, Springfield, Massachusetts, 1938. From left to right: Louisa Calder, Aino Aalto, Cordelia Sargent Pond, Katherine Dreier, Siegfried Giedion, Alvar Aalto, Calder, and Fernand Léger.
The opening of Calder Mobiles, George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery, Springfield, Massachusetts, 1938. From left to right: Louisa Calder, Aino Aalto, Cordelia Sargent Pond, Katherine Dreier, Siegfried Giedion, Alvar Aalto, Calder, and Fernand Léger.
December 1938

Artek Gallery, Helsinki, presents “Alexander Calder: Jewelry.”

CF, exhibition file

1939

1939

Calder is commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, to make Lobster Trap and Fish Tail, a mobile he installs in the principal stairwell of the museum’s new building on West Fifty-third Street.

Lipman 1976, 332; Marter 1991, 197
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1949)
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1939), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1949Photograph by Soichi Sunami © Museum of Modern Art, Soichi Sunami
Lobster Trap and Fish Tail (1939), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1949Photograph by Soichi Sunami
1939

Calder is invited to make sculptures for an African habitat designed by Oscar Nitzschke for the Bronx Zoo. Calder conceives of treelike sculptures to be made in steel so they can withstand the abuse of the wild animals. Although the habitat is never realized, Calder creates five

models for the project: Sphere Pierced by Cylinders, Hollow Egg, Four Leaves and Three Petals, Leaves and Tripod, and The Hairpins.

New York Times, 24 October
The Hairpins (1940)
The Hairpins (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Hairpins (1939), "small shop" New York City storefront studio, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter
Spring 1939

Calder creates six maquettes to complement architect Percival Goodman’s design for the Smithsonian Gallery of Art Architectural Competition, sponsored by the Smithsonian Gallery of Art Commission. Goodman is awarded second place to Eliel Saarinen, and the

project goes unrealized.

CF, Calder to Matisse, 3 May 1942
1939

The exhibition “III Salão de Maio,” São Paulo, Brazil, includes gouaches and a mobile by Calder.

CF, exhibition file
After 1 March 1939

Calder is commissioned by Wallace K. Harrison and André Fouilhoux, architects of Consolidated Edison’s pavilion at the 1939 New York World’s Fair, to design a “water ballet” for the building’s fountain. Although water jets are installed around the pavilion, this ballet is never

executed.

Calder 1966, 176
Drawing for Water Ballet (1939)
Drawing for Water Ballet, 1939Calder Foundation, New York
Drawing for Water Ballet, 1939Calder Foundation, New York
30 April 1939

Calder submits a Plexiglas stabile to a competition sponsored by Röhm and Haas at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The work is exhibited at the Hall of Industrial Science during the New York World’s Fair.

CF, exhibition file; Calder 1966, 175; "Abstract Sculpture in Plexiglas," 1939
9–27 May 1939

“Calder Mobiles–Stabiles” is on view at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York.

CF, exhibition file
Calder Mobiles–Stabiles (1939)
Front and back cover of catalogue for Calder Mobiles–Stabiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1939
Front and back cover of catalogue for Calder Mobiles–Stabiles, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1939
25 May 1939

The Calders’ second daughter, Mary, is born.

Calder 1966, 174
The Calder Family (1939)
The Calder Family, New York, 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
The Calder Family, New York, 1939Photograph by Herbert Matter
Summer 1939

Sert and his wife, Moncha, pay an extended visit to the Calders in Roxbury.

Calder 1966, 174

1940

14 May–1 June 1940

Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, presents “Calder.”

CF, exhibition file
Black Beast (1940)
Installation photograph showing Black Beast, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Installation photograph showing Black Beast, Calder, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1940Photograph by Herbert Matter
Before 9 October 1940

Marian Willard shows an array of Calder’s jewelry to Valentina, a renowned haute couture dressmaker in New York. Valentina objects to the prices of the items and Willard takes them next to Harper’s Bazaar where they are photographed.

CF, Willard to Calder, 9 October
11–14 October 1940

A private exhibition of Calder’s sculptures takes place inside and outside the home of Wallace Harrison and his wife, Ellen, in Huntington, Long Island.

MoMA, invitation; CF, Myra Martin to Ellen Harrison, 24 October
16 October 1940

Carmel Snow, the legendary editor of Harper’s Bazaar, writes to Willard: The photographs of Sandy Calder’s jewelry turned out beautifully . . . we will publish these either in December or January.

CF, Snow to Willard, 16 October
3–25 December 1940

Calder Jewelry” is presented at Willard Gallery, New York. In her press release for the show, Willard writes, These works of art are savage and deliberate and self-confidently sophisticated . . . This is a master modern artist’s contribution to the history of fashion. For a world already in

chains it is superb stuff.

CF, exhibition file
Calder Jewelry (1940)
Invitation to Calder Jewelry, Willard Gallery, New York, 1940
Invitation to Calder Jewelry, Willard Gallery, New York, 1940

1941

1941

Harrison commissions Calder to make a mobile for the Hotel Avila Ballroom, Caracas, Venezuela.

CF, project file
Hotel Avila Ballroom (1941)
Mobile, Hotel Avila Ballroom, Caracas, Venezuela, 1941
Mobile, Hotel Avila Ballroom, Caracas, Venezuela, 1941
28 March–11 April 1941

“Alexander Calder: Mobiles / Jewelry” and “Fernand Léger: Gouaches / Drawings” are presented at the Arts and Crafts Club of New Orleans. Twenty-five works of jewelry are exhibited.

CF, exhibition file
April 1941

Herbert Matter photographs Calder’s Roxbury studio.

CF, photography file
Roxbury studio (1941)
Mobile, Aluminum Leaves, Red Post, Un effet du japonais, Giraffe, and The Great Yucca, Roxbury studio, 1941Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Mobile, Aluminum Leaves, Red Post, Un effet du japonais, Giraffe, and The Great Yucca, Roxbury studio, 1941Photograph by Herbert Matter
27 May–14 June 1941

“Alexander Calder: Recent Works” is held at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York.

CF, exhibition file
Alexander Calder: Recent Works (1941)
Interior illustration for catalogue for Alexander Calder: Recent Works, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1941
Interior illustration for catalogue for Alexander Calder: Recent Works, Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, 1941
9 August 1941

Calder performs Cirque Calder in Roxbury. Yves Tanguy assists.

CF, family photographs
Calder and Yves Tanguy preparing a performance of Cirque Calder (1941)
Calder and Yves Tanguy preparing a performance of Cirque Calder (1926–31), Roxbury studio, 1941
Calder and Yves Tanguy preparing a performance of Cirque Calder (1926–31), Roxbury studio, 1941
27 September–27 October 1941

“Calder: Mobiles, Stabiles, Jewelry” and “A Few Paintings by Paul Klee” are on view at the Design Project, Los Angeles. Sent along with the jewelry is an inventory book with illustrations by Calder of each piece.

CF, exhibition file
1 October 1941

Following the success of the previous year, Willard planned a second jewelry show. As she wrote to Calder, I am a little concerned about the lack of “jewels” on the horizon at present . . . You will have to do prodigious work the next two months. Remember the small, well

fashioned, wearable ones are what we will cash in on.

CF, Willard to Calder, 1 October
29 October 1941

Calder sends jewelry to Charlotte Whitney Allen in Rochester, who plans to display it for the Christmas season. The jewelry is here and it is too beautiful. I hope we will sell a lot and make our everlasting fortune. We can’t find any list of pieces. Was there one in the box or will you send it later.

CF, Allen to Calder, 4 November
November 1941

Tanguy and Kay Sage, the Surrealist painters, rent a home from their friend Hugh Chisholm in nearby Woodbury, Connecticut, and become close friends of the Calders. Rose and André Masson live in nearby New Preston.

Suther 1997, 106
Standing, left to right (1941)
Standing, left to right: André Masson, Kay Sage, and Calder; sitting, left to right: André Breton, Susanna Perkins Hare, Louisa Calder, Rose Masson, unidentified child, Charlie Prescott, Mary Calder, and Teeny Matisse, Roxbury, 1941
Standing, left to right: André Masson, Kay Sage, and Calder; sitting, left to right: André Breton, Susanna Perkins Hare, Louisa Calder, Rose Masson, unidentified child, Charlie Prescott, Mary Calder, and Teeny Matisse, Roxbury, 1941
Late Fall 1941

Ellen Harrison asks Calder if he is interested in exhibiting his jewelry in Washington, D.C.: Everyone is in Washington these days and there is nothing to by [sic]. I wonder if you would like to show your jewelry if a decent place for such an exhibit could be found? . . . I will ask around if you

would like to have me do so.

CF, Harrison to Calder
3 November 1941

Elizabeth Rockwell, owner of the Outlines Gallery in Pittsburgh, writes to Calder: Starting on November 16 there is an exhibit of modern prints, woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, etc.—and I am wondering whether I might show some of your jewelry concurrently with this exhibit.

CF, Rockwell to Calder, 3 November
4–19 November 1941

“Mobiles by Alexander Calder, Stabiles and Jewelry” is held at the San Francisco Museum of Art. Eighty pieces of jewelry are exhibited: The “jewels” fashioned from odd pieces of metal and rocks are an adventure.

CF, exhibition file; San Francisco Chronicle, 16 November
Before 7 November 1941

At her request, Calder sends Charlotte Whitney Allen an inventory book of the jewelry he has sent her. It is an illustrated list of each work sent drawn in a composition notebook. She thanks him in a letter for the “most explicit list” and writes that the window display of his jewelry

that she has arranged “is really quite grand and everyone is very enthusiastic.”

CF, Allen to Calder, 7 November
12 November 1941

Calder sends thirty-five works of jewelry to Rockwell of the Outlines Gallery for inclusion in a group exhibition. An illustrated list of works accompanies the shipment.

CF, illustrated jewelry list dated by Calder
8–21 December 1941

Willard Gallery, New York, exhibits “Calder Jewelry.” After setting up the exhibition the previous day, Calder returns briefly to Roxbury on the morning of 8 December to pick up Louisa and bring her to New York for the show’s vernissage. Upon his arrival, Louisa informs him that the

Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor the previous day and the United States has entered World War II.

CF, exhibition file; Calder 1966, 179
18 December 1941

Calder sends thirty-four works of jewelry that have recently been returned to him from his exhibitions in California to Ellen Harrison in Washington, D.C.

CF, jewelry inventory book

1942

1942

Calder meets artist Saul Steinberg.

CF, Whitney memorial program
3 March 1942

Calder is commissioned to make Red Petals for the Arts Club of Chicago.

Calder 1966, 185–86; CF, Rue Shaw to Calder, 3 March
Red Petals (1942)
Red Petals, Arts Club of Chicago, 1942Photograph by Frederick O. Bemm
Red Petals, Arts Club of Chicago, 1942Photograph by Frederick O. Bemm
7–28 March 1942

Sculptures by Calder and paintings by Miró are exhibited at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.

CF, exhibition file
Joan Miró–Alexander Calder (1942)
Installation photograph, Joan Miró–Alexander Calder, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, 1942
Installation photograph, Joan Miró–Alexander Calder, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, 1942
Before 9 March 1942

After several months with his jewelry, Rockwell of Outlines Gallery writes, Tomorrow the jewelry will be packed and sent. I would like to keep it even longer but unfortunately there seems no hope of selling more . . . I am sorry to hear that your recent exhibits have not been very successful

and I wish that I had more success with mine. The war, I suppose.

CF, Rockwell to Calder, 9 March
Spring 1942

In regard to the jewelry sent from Calder the previous winter, Ellen Harrison writes, I hated to send you back your . . . things without removing even one piece last winter. Well let’s forget that one.

CF, Ellen Harrison to Calder
19 May–12 June 1942

“Calder: Recent Work” is held at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York.

CF, exhibition file
20 May 1942

Calder performs Cirque Calder at Herbert and Mercedes Matter’s apartment, 328 East Forty-second Street, New York.

CF, Calder to de Creeft, 18 May
June 1942

The first issue of VVV, a Surrealist journal founded and edited by David Hare in collaboration with editorial advisers Breton and Max Ernst, is published. The issue features two Matter photographs of Calder’s Roxbury property. Written below the photographs:
In our days the aviary of all


Light and the nocturnal refuge
Of all tinkling.
The Studio of Alexander Calder, Roxbury, Conn.
The time of enchantment and the art of living.

VVV 1942
July–November 1942

Calder is classified 1-A (top eligibility) by the army, though he is never drafted. He studies industrial camouflage at New York University and applies for a commission in camouflage work with the Marine Corps: Although the army says that the painter is of little or no use in modern

camouflage, I feel that this is not so, and that the camoufleur is still a painter, but on an immense scale . . . and in a negative sense (for instead of creating, he demolishes a picture and reduces it to nil . . . ).

Calder 1966, 183; CF, Calder application to the Marine Corps, 21 September
14 October–7 November 1942

The Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies sponsors the exhibition “First Papers of Surrealism” at the Whitelaw Reid Mansion, New York, organized by Breton and Duchamp. Duchamp creates his mile of string on which he invites Calder to hang his works. Calder proceeds to

construct small paper sculptures intended as a pun on the exhibition’s title. However, Breton vetoes the collaboration, and the large standing mobile The Spider is installed.

CF, exhibition file
First Papers of Surrealism (1942)
Installation photograph, First Papers of Surrealism, Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies, Whitelaw Reid Mansion, New York, 1942
Installation photograph, First Papers of Surrealism, Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies, Whitelaw Reid Mansion, New York, 1942
20 October 1942

The inaugural exhibition of Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century, New York, opens with an installation designed by Frederick Kiesler. Guggenheim wears one earring by Tanguy and one earring by Calder, who is represented in the exhibition by Arc of Petals.

Lader 1981, 363–67
Before 12 November 1942

The Calders move to 255 East Seventy-second Street. After housing Luis Buñuel and his family at 244 East Eighty-sixth Street, the Calders eventually signed over the lease to them.

CF, Masson to Calder, 12 November
7 December 1942–22 February 1943

“Artists for Victory: An Exhibition of Contemporary American Art” is presented at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Calder wins fourth prize. Other prizewinners include de Creeft and Philip Evergood who are interviewed with Calder at the museum for a WABC Radio

program, Living Art, that broadcasts on 8 December.

CF, exhibition file; AAA, oral history collection
Winter 1942

Calder works on a new open form of sculpture made of carved wood and wire. They had a suggestion of some kind of cosmic nuclear gases—which I won’t try to explain. I was interested in the extremely delicate, open composition. Sweeney and Duchamp propose the name “constellations” for

these works, seven of which will be included in the artist’s upcoming retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Calder 1966, 179; Arnason and Mulas 1971, 202; CF, exhibition file
Vertical Constellation with Bomb (1943)
Vertical Constellation with Bomb, 1943Photograph by Herbert Matter © Calder Foundation, New York
Vertical Constellation with Bomb, 1943Photograph by Herbert Matter

1943

16 April–15 May 1943

Art of This Century, New York, hosts “Exhibition of Collage,” including works by Arp, Braque, Calder, Joseph Cornell, Duchamp, Ernst, Robert Motherwell, and Picasso.

Lader 1981, 375
18 May–5 June 1943

“Calder: Constellationes” is shown at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York.

CF, exhibition file
28 May–6 July 1943

“17 Mobiles by Alexander Calder” is held at the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts. The catalogue contains a statement by Calder: At first [my] objects were static, seeking to give a sense of cosmic relationship. Then . . . I introduced flexibility, so that the relationships

would be more general. From that I went to the use of motion for its contrapuntal value, as in good choreography.

Calder 1943, 6
28 August 1943

Calder writes to Sweeney about his forthcoming retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. I forgot to show you this object. One swings the red (iron) ball in a small circle—this movement and the inertia of the rod and the length of thread develops a very complicated

pattern of movement. The impedimenta—boxes, cymbal, bottles, cans etc. add to the complication, and also add sounds of thuds, crashes, etc.—This is a reconstruction of one I had in Paris in ’33. I will bring it down and set it up for you to see. I call it the “Small Sphere and Heavy Sphere.”

CF, Calder to Sweeney, 28 August
20 September 1943

Arnold Newman photographs Calder at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

CF, photography file
Eucalyptus (1943)
Calder with Eucalyptus (1940) at Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1943Photograph by Arnold Newman © Arnold Newman
Calder with Eucalyptus (1940) at Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1943Photograph by Arnold Newman
29 September 1943–16 January 1944

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, presents “Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions,” curated by Sweeney and Duchamp. Calder writes, Simplicity of equipment and an adventurous spirit in attacking the unfamiliar or unknown are apt to result in a primitive and

vigorous art. Somehow the primitive is usually much stronger than art in which technique and flourish abound. Originally scheduled to close on 28 November 1943, the exhibition is extended to 16 January 1944 due to public demand.

 

CF, exhibition file
Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions (1943)
Installation photograph, Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1943Photograph by Soichi Sunami © Museum of Modern Art, Soichi Sunami
Installation photograph, Alexander Calder: Sculptures and Constructions, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1943Photograph by Soichi Sunami
20–21 October 1943

Calder gives two performances of Cirque Calder in the Members Room of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, for friends and staff.

CF, exhibition file
30 November–31 December 1943

Peggy Guggenheim presents “Natural, Insane, Surrealist Art” at Art of This Century, New York. Organized with Ladislas Segy, the exhibition features two works by Calder, as well as works by Ernst, Klee, Masson, Roberto Matta, Miró, and Tanguy, among others.

Lader 1981, 385
1–7 December 1943

Calder travels to Chicago to prepare for his exhibition of jewelry at the Arts Club.

CF, exhibition file; NL, Calder to Shaw, 13 November; Calder 1966, 185
3–27 December 1943

The Arts Club of Chicago exhibits “Jewelry by Alexander Calder.”

CF, exhibition file; NL, Calder to Shaw, 13 November; Calder 1966, 185
4 December 1943

Both the “Big Room” and part of the Roxbury farmhouse are destroyed by an electrical fire. Louisa tells Calder about the fire when he joins them on 7 December. What was destroyed was the icehouse, my original workshop, where the electricity had probably shorted, and the

woodshed and a corner of the bathroom. The toilet, which was of china, had exploded. It must have been a dreary business for Louisa and Malcolm to drag all they could save to my new shop—this seemed to fill it completely when I got there. Gone were the unencumbered spaces.

Calder 1966, 186; NL, Calder to Shaw, 14 December
After the Roxbury fire (1943)
After the Roxbury fire, December 1943
After the Roxbury fire, December 1943

1944

1944

Agnes Rindge Claflin writes and narrates Alexander Calder: Sculpture and Constructions, a film based on the retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Cinematography is by Matter.

CF, project file
1944

Calder gives Black Flower to the Museum of Western Art in Moscow.

Calder 1966, 185
Black Flower (1943)
Black Flower (1940), 1943Photograph by Soichi Sunami © Museum of Modern Art, Soichi Sunami
Black Flower (1940), 1943Photograph by Soichi Sunami
1 February 1944

Calder visits Mondrian in the hospital shortly after he lapses into a coma. Calder is among those present—with Richter, Dudensing, Sweeney, and others—when Mondrian dies at 5:08 a.m.

CF, Holtzman diary, 1 February
3 February 1944

Calder attends Mondrian’s memorial service at the Universal Chapel at Lexington Avenue and Fifty-second Street, New York.

Bois 1994, 85
19 February–18 March 1944

“Color and Space in Modern Art Since 1900” is on view at Mortimer Brandt, New York. The exhibition includes three sculptures by Calder, including Cage within a Cage and Morning Star.

MA, brochure
27 March–9 April 1944

Calder’s Black Flower is loaned by the Russian Embassy in Washington, D.C., to “Calder: Paintings, Mobiles, Stabiles and Jewelry,” held at the local gallery France Forever. Calder attends the preview on 26 March, organized under the patronage of Henri Hoppenot, Minister

Plenipotentiary, Delegate of the French Committee of National Liberation, and he performs Cirque Calder on 25 and 26 March at the Dance Playhouse, through the courtesy of Evelyn Davis.

CF, exhibition file; Calder 1966, 184–85
Before 3 April 1944

Calder makes the acquaintance of Keith Warner, owner of a leather manufacturing company and already a patron of several artists. He also becomes a devoted supporter of Calder. Until his death in 1959, Warner commissions dozens of works by Calder, including at least ten

works of jewelry for his wife, Edna. Among these are some substantial pieces fashioned from gold.

CF, Warner correspondence
Louisa Calder with daughters Sandra and Mary at Keith Warner’s house in Fort Lauderdale (1946)
Louisa Calder with daughters Sandra and Mary at Keith Warner's house in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1946
Louisa Calder with daughters Sandra and Mary at Keith Warner's house in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1946
Before May 1944

In New York, Calder meets Brazilian architect Henrique Mindlin.

Calder 1966, 198
Summer 1944

The Calders live in the Tanguy-Sage household in Woodbury, Connecticut, while the burned home is repaired. Nitzschke made some very nice plans for the rebuilding + enlargement of the shop, but we are still awaiting …. In the kitchen [the] partition between it + the dining room has

been removed, and we have steel French windows (6′ wide) and a door leading outside.

Calder 1966, 187; CF, Calder to the Matters, 15 July; ASCR conversation with Mary Calder Rower, 16 November 1997
Fall 1944

Curt Valentin publishes Three Young Rats and Other Rhymes, with eighty-five drawings by Calder and edited by Sweeney.

CF, project file
6–24 September 1944

Calder is represented by a work on paper in the exhibition “Abstract and Surrealist Art in the United States” at the San Francisco Museum of Art.

CF, exhibition file
28 November–23 December 1944

The exhibition “Recent Work by Alexander Calder” at Buchholz Gallery/Curt Valentin, New York, includes recent plaster and bronze sculptures and the drawings for Three Young Rats and Other Rhymes.

CF, exhibition file
12 December 1944–31 January 1945

“The Imagery of Chess: A Group Exhibition of Paintings, Sculpture, Newly Designed Chessmen, Music, and Miscellany” is presented at Julien Levy Gallery, New York. Calder exhibits two chess sets alongside works by Duchamp, Ernst, and Tanguy, among others.

CF, exhibition file
Before 25 December 1944

After complaining to Calder that she has nothing to wear to the upcoming Vassar College Christmas party, Claflin receives a tiara that Calder dubs Fire Proof Veil. The headpiece is constructed of a series of sheet metal letters, “A, R, V, C, P, N, Y,” each dangling from its own wire

attached to a central headband. The letters stand for “Agnes Rindge Vassar College Poughkeepsie New York” and are designed to hang in front of the wearer’s face.

CF, object file

1945

6 January 1945

Calder’s father, Alexander Stirling Calder, dies in Brooklyn. Calder and Louisa leave their daughters in the care of the Massons and bury Stirling in Philadelphia.

ASCR conversation with Mary Calder Rower, 16 November 1997
Calder with his father (1941)
Calder with his father, Alexander Stirling Calder, 1941
Calder with his father, Alexander Stirling Calder, 1941
6–24 February 1945

Buchholz Gallery/Curt Valentin, New York, presents “Recent Work by American Sculptors” and includes a standing mobile by Calder.

AAA, catalogue
14 March 1945

Calder receives a contract from composer Remi Gassmann on behalf of the University of Chicago for the design of costumes and scenery for the dance project Billy Sunday.

CF, Gassmann to Calder, 14 March; CF, Calder to Warner, 6 March, 2 April
April 1945

Masson brings French author and philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre to visit Calder in Roxbury.

CF, Calder to Zervos, 25 May; Calder 1966, 188–89
1 June 1945

Commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, to make a work for the sculpture garden, Calder creates Man-Eater with Pennants.

CF, Calder to Warner, 1 June
Man-Eater with Pennants (c. 1948)
Man-Eater with Pennants (1945), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, c. 1948
Man-Eater with Pennants (1945), The Museum of Modern Art, New York, c. 1948
19 June 1945

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, presents the First Exhibition of the Museum Collection of Painting and Sculpture. Calder is represented by five sculptures.

CF, exhibition file
Before 3 July 1945

Calder produces a series of small-scale works, many from scraps trimmed during the making of other objects. Let’s mail these little objects to [Louis] Carré, in Paris, and have a show, Duchamp suggests when he sees them; by taking advantage of the newly available international

airmail system, Duchamp’s action predates “mail art” by nearly two decades. Carré responds to Duchamp’s proposal. Interested show Calder miniatures would also gladly exhibit mobile sculptures available all sizes and colours.

Calder 1966, 188; CF, Carré to Duchamp; CF, Duchamp to Calder, 3 July
Telegram from Louis Carré to Marcel Duchamp (1946)
Telegram from Louis Carré to Marcel Duchamp regarding Alexander Calder: Mobiles, Stabiles, Constellations, 1946Calder Foundation, New York
Telegram from Louis Carré to Marcel Duchamp regarding Alexander Calder: Mobiles, Stabiles, Constellations, 1946Calder Foundation, New York
16 July 1945

Calder packs thirty-seven miniature mobiles and stabiles into six small cartons and mails them to Carré in Paris. Due to U.S. Postal Service regulations, he gives the name of six different senders for each package: himself, Duchamp, Masson, Sweeney, Tanguy, and Renée

(Ritou) Nitzschke.

CF, Calder to Carré, 19 July
19 July 1945

Calder proposes to Carré to have Sartre write an essay for his show. I met Jean-Paul Sartre when he was here, and he came + visited my workshop. Perhaps he would consent to write a little preface if you thought that desirable.

CF, Calder to Carré, 19 July
Loading…

Bibliography 209

1937

“Alexander Calder Named to Design Radio Award.” (Publication unknown), c. 1937.

Newspaper

Kunsthalle Basel. Konstruktivisten. Exhibition catalogue. 1937.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

“Art Galleries: Spring, Circuses, and Sport.” New Yorker (February 1937).

Magazine

Genauer, Emily. “What’s New In Art: Calder Work Original, At Least.” New York World-Telegram, 27 February 1937.

Newspaper

McBride, Henry. “Two Extreme Modernists: Calder’s Gay Mobiles Suggest the War is Over; Tommy Says No.” New York Sun, 27 February 1937.

Newspaper

Klein, Jerome. New York Post, 27 February 1937.

Newspaper

B., A.”Calder: Artist as Toymaker.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 28 February 1937.

Newspaper

McCausland, Elizabeth. “Stabiles and Mobiles by Alexander Calder.” Springfield Sunday Union and Republican, 28 February 1937.

Newspaper

Jewell, Edward Alden. “Fantasy Rears Its Head.” New York Times, 28 February 1937.

Newspaper

“Stabiles and Mobiles.” Time, vol. 29, no. 9 (1 March 1937).

Magazine

Vaughan, Malcolm. “Alexander Calder.” New York American, 6 March 1937.

Newspaper

Frankel, Robert. “Calder: A Humorous and Inventive Artist.” Art News, vol. 35 (13 March 1937).

Magazine

“Hartford Is Given Chance to View Abstract Art from Street Angle.” (Publication unknown), 15 April 1937.

Newspaper

“At the Honolulu Academy of Arts.” (Publication unknown), 29 May 1937.

Newspaper

Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris. Origines et développement de l’art international indépendant. Exhibition catalogue. 1937.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

Calder, Alexander. “Mobiles.” In The Painter’s Object, edited by Myfanwy Evans. London: Gerald Howe, 1937.

General Reference

“Souvenirs de l’Exposition 1937.” Cahiers d’Art, nos. 8–10 (1937).

Magazine

Artek Gallery, Helsinki. Fernand Léger / Alexander Calder. Exhibition catalogue. 1937.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

Juliette. “Vernissage av modernt hos Artek.” Nya Pressen, 30 November 1937.

Newspaper

Tracy, Charles. “HO to AA, A Stage Playlet in Two Scenes.” Transition, no. 26 (Winter 1937).

Magazine

Tayler, Herbert. “The Paris Exhibition.” Axis, no. 8 (early Winter 1937).

Magazine

“Motion, by Rail and Wire.” Daily Express, 2 December 1937.

Newspaper

“An American Wire-Sculptor.” Scotsman, 8 December 1937.

Newspaper

Blunt, Anthony. The Spectator (10 December 1937).

Magazine

“Synthetic Circus.” Evening Standard, 10 December 1937.

Newspaper

“Alexander Calder at the Mayor Gallery.” The New Statesman and Nation, 11 December 1937.

Newspaper

Gordon, Jan. “Problems.” Observer, 12 December 1937.

Newspaper

Newton, Eric. “Two and Three Dimensions: Techniques in Carving and Painting.” Sunday Times, 12 December 1937.

Newspaper

“An Artist’s Circus.” Star, 15 December 1937.

Newspaper

“Shop-Hound Goes to a Party.” Vogue (22 December 1937).

Magazine

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Magazine

Earp, T. W. “A Gay Plastic Fantasy.” Daily Telegraph, 24 December 1937.

Newspaper

“Genius in Wire.” News Review (28 December 1937).

Magazine

“Mobiles.” Manchester Guardian, 28 December 1937.

Newspaper

1938

Sweeney, James Johnson. “L’Art Contemporain: Allemagne, Angleterre, Etats-Unis.” Cahiers d’Art, vol. 13, nos. 1–2 (1938).

Magazine

“Mobile Sculpture.” Architectural Review, vol. 83, no. 494 (January 1938).

Magazine

Calder, Alexander. “Letter to the Editor.” Technology Review, vol. 40, no. 5 (March 1938).

Magazine

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Tentoonstelling Abstracte Kunst. Exhibition catalogue. 1938.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

Galerie Guggenheim Jeune, London. Exhibition of Contemporary Sculpture: Brancusi, Laurens, Pevsner, Henry Moore, Duchamp-Villon, Hans Arp, Calder, Taeuber-Arp. Exhibition catalogue. 1938.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

Calder, Alexander. “Mercury Fountain.” Stevens Indicator, vol. 55, no. 3 (May 1938).

Magazine

Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris. Trois siècles d’art aux États-Unis. Exhibition catalogue. 1938. Preface by Jean Zay; foreword by A. Conger Goodyear; texts by Alfred H. Barr, Jr., John McAndrew, Beaumont Newhall, and Iris Barry.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

George Walter Vincent Smith Gallery, Springfield, Massachusetts. Calder Mobiles. Exhibition catalogue. 1938. Foreword by James Johnson Sweeney.

Solo Exhibition Catalogue

Rogers, W. G. “Local Color.” Springfield Union, 9 November 1938.

Newspaper

“Springfield: A Calder Show.” Art News, vol. 37 (19 November 1938).

Magazine

S. “Alexander Calders smycken hos Artek.” Nya Pressen, 9 December 1938.

Newspaper

1939

“Mobiles en mouvement.” Cahiers d’Art, vol. 14, nos. 1–4 (1939).

Magazine

São Paulo, Brazil. III Salão de Maio. Exhibition catalogue. 1939.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

New Yorker (c. 1939)

Magazine

Bill, Max. “The Mastery of Space.” Sculpture (1939).

Magazine

Sweeney, James Johnson. “Alexander Calder: Movement as a Plastic Element.” Plus, no. 2 (February 1939).

Magazine

“Modern Sculpture: Is It Art, Or What?” New York Times Magazine (5 February 1939).

Magazine

Division of Decorative Arts, Department of Fine Arts, San Francisco. Golden Gate International Exposition, Decorative Arts Official Catalogue. Exhibition catalogue. 1939.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

“Pictures on Exhibit.” (Publication unknown), May 1939.

Magazine

Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York. Calder Mobiles–Stabiles. Exhibition catalogue. 1939.

Solo Exhibition Catalogue

“Fantastic and Ingenious Constructions.” Art News, vol. 37 (13 May 1939).

Magazine

“Mobile Sculptures in Gallery Shows.” New York World-Telegram, 13 May 1939.

Newspaper

“Art to Move.” Cue (13 May 1939).

Magazine

“Attractions in the Galleries.” New York Sun, 13 May 1939.

Newspaper

“Mobiles and Stabiles.” New York Herald Tribune, 14 May 1939.

Newspaper

Jewell, Edward Alden. “Museum of Modern Art Looks Ahead.” New York Times, 14 May 1939.

Newspaper

Breuning, Margaret. Journal and American, 14 May 1939.

Newspaper

Bird, P. “Calder and Nature.” Art Digest, vol. 13 (15 May 1939).

Magazine

“Motion Man.” Time, vol. 33, no. 2 (29 May 1939).

Magazine

Breuning, Margaret. “Calder Mobiles and Stabiles.” American Magazine of Art, vol. 32, no. 6 (June 1939).

Magazine

“Abstract Sculpture in Plexiglas.” Architectural Forum, vol. 70, no. 6 (June 1939).

Magazine

“Results of Plexiglas Competition.” Architectural Record (June 1939).

Magazine

“Plexiglas Sculpture Prizes are Awarded.” Pencil Points (June 1939).

Magazine

“Os estrangeiros no III Salão de Maio.” Diário da Noite, 8 July 1939.

Newspaper

Calder, Alexander. “A Water Ballet.” Theatre Arts Monthly, vol. 23, no. 8 (August 1939).

Magazine

1940

New York University, New York. Museum of Living Art; A. E. Gallatin Collection. Exhibition catalogue. 1940.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

“Versus.” Architectural Forum, vol. 72 (April 1940).

Magazine

Lane, James W. “Annual Calder Mobile Parade.” Art News, vol. 38 (18 May 1940).

Magazine

McBride, Henry. New York Sun, 18 May 1940.

Newspaper

Klein, Jerome. “Fanciful Game.” New York Post, 18 May 1940.

Newspaper

“Mobiles and Stabiles.” New York Herald Tribune, 19 May 1940.

Newspaper

Devree, Howard. “A Reviewer’s Notebook.” New York Times, 19 May 1940.

Newspaper

Division of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, Department of Fine Arts, San Francisco. Golden Gate International Exposition, Contemporary Art Official Catalogue. Exhibition catalogue. 1940.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

“Circus in Wire.” Newsweek, vol. 15, no. 22 (27 May 1940).

Magazine

“Calder’s ‘Mobiles.’” Art Digest, vol. 14, no. 17 (1 June 1940).

Magazine

Mumford, Lewis. “The Dead Past and the Dead Present.” Architectural Forum, vol. 72 (June 1940).

Magazine

“Art Forms in Architecture . . . New Techniques Affect Both.” Architectural Record (October 1940).

Magazine

“Novel Handmade Jewelry on Exhibit.” Women’s Wear Daily, 4 December 1940.

Newspaper

McBride, Henry. New York Sun, 7 December 1940.

Newspaper

Lane, James W. “Alexander Calder as Jewelry Designer.” Art News, vol. 39 (14 December 1940).

Magazine

McCausland, Elizabeth. “Some Shows of the Holiday Season.” Springfield Sunday Union and Republican, 15 December 1940.

Newspaper

New York Herald Tribune, 15 December 1940.

Newspaper

Buchholz Gallery, New York. Exhibition of American Sculpture To-Day. Exhibition catalogue. 1940.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

1941

“Muralist.” New Yorker, vol. 16, no. 47 (4 January 1941).

Magazine

Coates, Robert M. “The Art Galleries: Modern French–And Some Americans.” New Yorker, vol. 16, no. 48 (11 January 1941).

Magazine

The Arts and Crafts Club of New Orleans. Alexander Calder: Mobiles / Jewelry and Fernand Léger: Gouaches / Drawings. Exhibition catalogue. 1941.

Group Exhibition Catalogue

Genauer, Emily. “The Matisse Gallery.” New York World-Telegram, 23 May 1941.

Newspaper

Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York. Alexander Calder: Recent Works. Exhibition catalogue. 1941.

Solo Exhibition Catalogue

Upton, Melville. “Calder Shows New ‘Mobiles.’” New York Sun, 31 May 1941.

Newspaper

Genauer, Emily. “Calder at Matisse.” New York World-Telegram, 31 May 1941.

Newspaper

Burrows, Carlyle. “Calder’s Mobiles.” New York Herald Tribune, 1 June 1941.

Newspaper

Jewell, Edward Alden. “Artists Depict a War-Torn World.” New York Times, 1 June 1941.

Newspaper

Frankel, Robert. “Alexander Calder.” Art News, vol. 40 (1–30 June 1941).

Magazine

Breuning, Margaret. Journal and American, 1 June 1941.

Newspaper

Camprubi, Ines. “Homenaje al Momento.” La Prensa, 4 June 1941.

Newspaper

Sacartoff, Elizabeth. “An Old Talent and Six New Ones Stack Up Well.” PM’s Weekly, 8 June 1941.

Newspaper
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